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Opening Paragraphs of Chapter 1:

On an evening in the latter part of April, 1775, a number of persons were collected in a small tavern in the town of Machias. A day or two previous the inhabitants had received the proclamation of the Provincial Congress of Massachusetts, authorizing and requiring preparations and efforts to be made incident to a state of hostility. The people of Machias had, from the first, been strenuously opposed to the usurpation of the British government; and the sole topic of conversation, whenever a few met together, was this exciting subject. On the evening in question a much larger number than usual had assembled to talk over the stirring news recently received from Boston.

Conspicuous among the rest were two young men, brothers, by the name of O'Brien, sons of Morris O'Brien, who came to this country from Cork, in Ireland. Seated around the ample fireplace, enjoying their pipes and cans, the all-engrossing topic of the hour was canvassed by one and all.

At last the elder of the brothers, Jeremiah O'Brien, spoke out: "Well, neighbors, what do you think of this rumor that is flying about?"

"What rumor do you allude to?" asked a man by the name of Foster, who sat near by, and who held the dignified office of colonel in the militia.

"Why, that the first blow has been struck, colonel, and American blood spilt at Lexington and Concord."

Publication Date

1912

Publisher

Sanborn Pub. Co.

City

Machias, Maine

Keywords

Machias Maine, Fiction, Revolutionary War, Lexington, Concord, Morris O'Brien, Jeremiah O'Brien, Burnham Tavern

Disciplines

History | Literature in English, North America

Comments

From Illsley's Forest and Shore.

Originally published by C.O. Furbush & Co., Machias, Maine, 1857.

Reprinted by Republican Press Association, Concord, N.H., 1890.

The liberty pole: a tale of Machias

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